Aspiring physician a perfect fit for new scholarship

Maryam Makhdoom receives first Thanu and Nongyao Kulachol Library Scholarship

Pictured left to right: Maryam Makhdoom, Jared and Maryann Dorn.

By Rebecca Renshaw

Maryam Makhdoom hadn’t heard of the Thanu and Nongyao Kulachol Library Scholarship. It’s a new scholarship with a specific focus, and that made Makhdoom its ideal first recipient.

Established in 2019, the scholarship supports students who want to work with populations in Southeast Asia doing public health projects, which aligns with her desire to go to Singapore for a semester to learn more about international public health.

Dean of Library Affairs John Pollitz contacted Makhdoom, a senior majoring in public health, to share the good news.

“I was thrilled to discover I was awarded this scholarship because it fits in so well with my desires to further my knowledge about public health in southeast Asia,” said Makhdoom, who is also the university’s 2020 Lincoln Academy of Illinois Student Laureate.

Makhdoom plans to devote her life to helping improve the health and lives of people however she can. She is particularly interested in the emerging interdisciplinary fields of global health diplomacy.

Her goal is to become a physician, focusing on health disparities and inequalities. She said she will likely specialize in the care of women and children.

She is also seeking a Fulbright scholarship for 2021-22 to expand her research into how cultural values affect health outcomes.

“Should I be awarded the Fulbright, I will use the Thanu and Nongyao Kulachol Library Scholarship I have received to travel to Singapore,” Makhdoom said. “I have been so blessed that this scholarship fits so well with my dreams.”

The creation of the scholarship was a collaborative effort between the SIU Foundation and Library Affairs, along with donors Jared and Maryann Dorn.

“Sometimes many students are not aware of scholarships that are available to them that align with their future plans,” Makhdoom said. “Donors really open up career paths for students and broaden their horizons. Such opportunities open their eyes and allows them to focus more clearly on their hopes and plans. I would encourage other donors to give so more students could benefit from opportunities such as the ones I have received here at SIU. I am so thankful for donors like Jared and Maryann Dorn, and I am excited about the future before me.”

Inspired, driven, thankful: Alumnus finds success, helps others achieve

james and joan hood

James and Joan Hood

By Rebecca Renshaw

What can someone do with a degree in English literature? Plenty, and SIU alumnus Jim Hood is the perfect example.

Hood’s degree propelled him into a successful career in the news and information industry.

“When you study and research literature, you learn how to condense a whole lot of information down to the essence,” he said. “In my opinion, it’s impossible to go wrong studying English literature. If you get a real base studying and researching literature, you can go out and do anything.”

Hood ’69 and his wife recently established the James R. and Joan Lisante Hood Fund for New Media Technology with a $30,000 gift. In 2020, the James R. and Joan Lisante Hood Endowed Scholarship for Creative Nonfiction will be created with an additional $40,000 contribution.

SIU offers inspiration, experience

John Gardner was Hood’s favorite professor. Gardner had built a reputation as a rebel in the field of medieval studies, specifically in the study of Geoffrey Chaucer.

“I remember Gardner reading ‘Canterbury Tales’ to my class. He would read it line by line and explain it in middle English,” Hood said. “It was as much anthropology as English literature. Gardner transformed it from a study of old bones into a study of beautiful poetry and fiction.”

While a student at SIU, Hood gravitated toward local news and spent most of his time as a radio reporter and freelance correspondent covering the social upheavals of the 1960s. He served as the news director of WSIU radio, covering civil rights and anti-Vietnam War activities. Hood also worked at WINI in Murphysboro and WJPF in Herrin.

“I remember finishing up the 2 p.m. news at WJPF when the phone rang,” he said. “A guy asked if I was the one who just delivered the news, and when I said that I had, he offered me a job at a radio station in Phoenix. After graduation, I packed my bags and went to Phoenix.”

Hood also regularly sat in on classes taught by Buckminster Fuller. He credits Fuller, in part, for his entrepreneurial spirit.

“I never forgot what I learned at SIU,” he said. “Fuller taught me about design, how to look at problems, and then how to think outside the box to solve those problems.”

Bridging the gap

Hood worked for 14 years as an editor and executive for Associated Press outlets across the country. His knack for solving problems coupled with his technical skills pushed him to start several startup companies, such as Zap News and Consumer Affairs.

“I’m the guy you can blame for consumers who won’t buy anything until they read the reviews,” Hood said.

Hood, now semi-retired, lives in Fairfax, Virginia, and runs Fairfax News.

“Basically, it’s my personal hobby. We cover Washington, D.C., and do stories on cops and robbers – that kind of thing.”

By giving to SIU’s creative writing program, he hopes to help bridge the gap between creative writing and technology.

“Sometimes people with a technical bent don’t know how to express themselves, and literary types are hopeless when it comes to technical stuff,” Hood said. “It’s my hope that by implementing new media projects using technology, it will help one or two starving English majors.”

Hood credits SIU with introducing him to some of the brightest people he ever met.

“I’ve always felt obligated to give back to SIU. It helps diverse students and attracts students from other countries. It also helps to lift up students from inner cities like East St. Louis and Chicago,” he said. “I think big universities like SIU need the benefits of philanthropy much more than private institutions.”

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Longtime SIU educator establishes scholarship

By Rebecca Renshaw

Todd Headrick, an emeritus faculty member of the SIU School of Education, has donated $50,000 to establish the Todd Headrick Endowed Scholarship for Graduate Studies in Education.

The endowed gift will fund scholarships for graduate students in education who maintain a 3.0 or higher GPA.

Headrick began his career at SIU in 1999 and has held several positions in the College of Education and Human Services, including a full professorship, chair of his department, the appointment of associate dean of research and his time as a fellow in the provost office. Headrick retired from SIU in January 2020 and now attends law school at Arizona State University Law School.

For Headrick, the importance of giving back was instilled in him at a young age.

“My grandfather would lend a helping hand to others around him, and he was always giving donations for causes he believed in. My mother and her husband are also generous to others, so it seems natural for me to lend a helping hand to students at SIU who are trying to get an education,” he said. “SIU has been good to me, so I want to pay it forward for students who could use the help.”

Between the recent reorganization process and the current COVID-19 situation, the way SIU educates future teachers has changed quite a bit.

“With the reorganization of colleges and schools, the School of Education is now much more focused on education, and it has streamlined the process of educating teachers,” Headrick said. “And, COVID-19 has really pushed the university to pivot into an online learning experience. I am hopeful SIU will continue to gain strength in providing a top-notch online learning environment.”

School of Education Dean M Cecil Smith thanked Headrick for the gift and shared his excitement about the future.

“First, it is a wonderful capstone to his career at SIU. Second, it clearly demonstrates his dedication to ensuring the success of students in the School of Education,” Smith said. “We will be able to provide anywhere from one to four new scholarships in the next academic year as a result of Dr. Headrick’s generosity.”

If you would like to learn how to donate to the School of Education, please click here.

Alumna Honors Parents Through Gift to the Saluki Alumni Plaza

By Rebecca Renshaw

Whenever Karen Bedwell Herhahn receives marketing material for SIU Carbondale, the photo of the iconic Pulliam Hall is most often prominently featured. However, Bedwell Herhahn does not see just the clock tower of the building—instead she sees University School where she went to junior high and high school. Fond memories of her formative years spent in that building always spring to her mind.

So last year when reviewing the plans for the new Saluki Alumni Plaza statue featured prominently in front of Pulliam Hall, she felt moved to donate $2,000 to the Plaza.

“I spent a lot of time in U-School looking out over SIU campus and it carries a special significance to me. My Father, R. Ralph Bedwell, was recruited by President Delyte Morris to serve as the Director of the newly developed Small Business Institute. Knowing the importance of a good education, my parents sent all of their children to University School. We had opportunities that did not exist in typical small-town schools.”

The primary purpose of University School was a place to do special research and observation. In 1951, the school building was completed. Lower classes, nursery, pre-school, etc., featured two-way glass for student teachers training. Juniors and seniors were able to enroll in university classes. Many of the instructors had their Ph.D.’s. An Olympic size pool, a large art and industrial arts wing with classrooms, an exceptional music program along with top academic programs were available to students. The last high school class to graduate was 1968. Grades nursery through 6th grade were closed in 1971.

Bedwell Herhahn currently sits on the College of Business and Analytics Dean’s External Advisory Board. Members of the Board address and make recommendations on strategic planning, the curriculum, development, and other critical issues.

In the early 2000’s, Bedwell Herhahn made a deferred gift of nearly $150,000 in honor of her parents and established the R. Ralph and Elnora J. Bedwell Endowment for Small Business Development. The purpose of the endowment is to support seminars for the small business community in Southern Illinois.

“Even though I completed all three of my college degrees at other universities, no other university has ever held my loyalty and fond memories like SIU Carbondale,” said Bedwell Herhahn.

 

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Library Establishes New Endowment to Honor Carus Family

By Rebecca Renshaw

Morris Library has worked with the SIU Foundation to transfer $1 million from the Carus Mineral Trust to create the new Alwin C. Carus Endowment.

John Pollitz, dean of library affairs says the relationship the library has with the benevolent Carus family has been long standing.

“The Carus family has been a valued supporter of the Morris Library and the Special Collections Research Center for over forty years. They have entrusted SIUC with the preservation and promotion of the complete papers of the Open Court Publishing Company. By creating this endowed chair, they have moved our relationship to the next level.”

To read the full press release and learn more about the Carus family and their commitment to science, religion and philosophy, click here. To support SIU’s Morris Library, click here.

SIU School of Law Alumna Extends a Helping Hand Once Again

Earlier this year, Beth Boggs, ’91 SIU School of Law alumna, and a partner of Boggs, Avellino, Lach & Boggs, donated 10,000 meals and face masks to students in the St. Louis public schools. A feature article on Boggs efforts can be read here.

Now Boggs is giving back again – this time to her alma mater, The SIU School of Law.

Recently, Cindy Walker, development officer for the law school, searched for a way to raise $27,600 to pay for AdaptiBar software to help with the third-year law students’ bar study.

“When I asked the Board of Visitors at the law school to help us fund this need, Beth stepped right up and donated $20,000 and helped raise another $1000.  Other board members then donated the rest,” said Walker.

“We have so many remarkable and loyal alumni,” said Camille Davidson, who took over as dean in July.

“Beth Boggs is a perfect example of the amazing SIU School of Law alumni who are willing to pay it forward and help us meet the needs of our students.”

SIU’s Morris Library honors Carus family with new endowment

Morris Library at Southern Illinois University Carbondale will honor a benevolent family by establishing the new Alwin C. Carus Endowment. The library’s leadership recently worked to the SIU Foundation to transfer $1 million from the Carus Mineral Trust to create the endowment. It will support archival work and a future endowed chair, the Alwin C. Carus Archivist and Professor of Philosophy, all fully funded by the revenue from the trust.

The Carus family’s relationship with the library is longstanding. Alwin Carus’ grandfather Edward Hegeler and his father, Paul Carus, founded the Open Court Publishing Company in La Salle, Illinois, in 1887. It was one of the first academic presses in the country without a university affiliation.

In the 1960s, Alwin and other surviving family members connected with SIU’s Morris Library, donating materials from the publishing company. The collection of manuscripts, books and other materials is one of the largest in the library’s Special Collections Research Center. It includes subjects focused on religion, science and philosophy, and it has an international reputation that draws people from around the world.

When Alwin Carus died in 2004, Morris Library also received $450,000 from a mineral trust in the family’s name. Every year since, the library has received an additional $150,000.

“Thanks to the generosity of the Carus family and the work of our Special Collections team, for many years we have developed our archival collections and assisted students and professionals locally and around the world,” said John Pollitz, dean of library affairs. “The establishment of the endowment is a win-win, in that it sets up the library into the future to continue its work while simultaneously honoring the original donor, Alwin C. Carus, and his final wishes.”

SIU Chancellor Austin Lane added that the future creation of an endowed chair is significant.

“Endowed chairs help us attract or retain outstanding faculty who are leaders in their fields,” Lane said. “We are deeply grateful to the Carus family, past and present, for helping us preserve and maintain our valuable, historical special collections.”

The youngest son of philosopher Paul Carus, Alwin C. Carus shared his father’s interests in history, archeology and astronomy. Alwin was born in 1901 in La Salle. He majored in chemistry and physics at the University of Chicago, worked in the research laboratory of the Carus Chemical Company and owned farms and ranches in the Badlands of North Dakota, western Minnesota, eastern Montana and the Peace River Valley of Alberta. He traveled to Iraq and Turkey in the 1950s to visit ancient archeological sites and joined several professional astronomical expeditions for observing solar eclipses.

“This particular endowment supports the Open Court collection, which, together with the John Dewey Papers, highlights our strengths in American philosophy,” Pollitz said. “SIU has, in past years, been celebrated as one of the top-tier leaders of this discipline, and the endowment helps to revitalize a commitment to this identifying feature of the university.”

The endowment will support an archivist for the Open Court Publishing Company records and its related collections, as well as other collections in philosophy. The position will also report on the activities and accomplishments with the Open Court Publishing Company records, the Alwin C. Carus Papers, Hegeler-Carus Family Papers and other relevant collections.

SIU School of Education Receives the Frank Murray Leadership Recognition

Congratulations to the SIU School of Education on receiving the Frank Murray Leadership Recognition for Continuous Improvement from the Council for the Accreditation of Education Preparation (CAEP) – only one of nine programs in the nation to receive the award!

Because teacher education occurs in programs within the School of Education  as well as in other specializations across Southern Illinois University, this award reflects a University-wide commitment to continually improving our quality teacher education program. Additionally, this award recognizes the commitment of our SIU Foundation donors who generously value and support SIU’s 150-year commitment to educating future teachers.

For example, donors to the Teachers Shape the Future fund can be proud that their gifts helped SIU’s Teacher Education Program  pay for a portion of the edTPA licensure test for teacher candidates, an exam used to identify teaching strengths and opportunities for improvement. By supporting this exam cost, required of all teacher candidates, SIU demonstrates its commitment to ensuring all K-12 students have accomplished teachers. This is one of SIU’s strengths that directly led to this award from CAEP.

Gifts to Teachers Shape the Future fund also support the annual Student Teaching Pinning Ceremony – a meaningful event that brings together student teachers and classroom teachers and is a key element of strengthening the relationship with our partners in the development and assessment of our clinical teaching experiences.

Educating, motivating and mentoring quality teachers has been an integral part of Southern Illinois University’s 150-year history. This award demonstrates that quality teacher education is not just our proud legacy, but also a strength today and a commitment to the future. Thank you to all the students, faculty, alumni and donors who made this impressive award possible!

Change Lives – Teach!

The SIU Foundation Has Remained Open For Business

By Matt Kupec

Even during these very challenging eight months of dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, the SIU Foundation has remained open and actively engaged with SIU alumni and donors to fulfill our mission of supporting Southern Illinois University Carbondale.

It hasn’t been easy, but we are pleased with the results.

There have been challenges – no travel to meet with our SIU supporters and cancellation of key events – but that doesn’t mean the Foundation team has gone to the sidelines to wait out the pandemic.

Early on when the doors at Colyer and Kaplan Halls were locked, the Foundation’s remote working strategy was:

  • Stay in touch with our alumni and donors with the goal of increasing the number of contacts with our donors.
  • Look for fundraising opportunities that were appropriate in these times that have been so difficult for many of our donors and friends.

It has been a great team effort. We have a really talented and hardworking team that has kept its focus on making SIU better. And our SIU alumni and donors have been spectacular during these COVID-19 months. The passion, the love and the pride our alumni and donors have for SIU is inspiring.

The SIU Foundation was one of the first universities out of the gate when the initial lockdown was enforced in March with a campaign to raise money for students in need due to the hardship of the virus.  The Saluki Cares Student Emergency Fund was launched to help students without laptops to attend online courses and those in dire need of food and shelter as they lost jobs due to the virus.

SIU alumni and donors responded in a big way! Nearly $280,000 in critical funds were raised to support our students in need. More than 1,200 students were supported. And not one student who needed help was forced to withdraw from school.

On Dec. 1, the Foundation will hold a Virtual Scholarship Dinner, inviting hundreds of scholarship donors to meet with their students via Zoom through individual breakout sessions after hearing remarks from Chancellor Austin Lane. The Scholarship Dinner is typically one of the highlights of the year, bringing donors and students together on our SIU campus for an evening of celebration and thanks.

The Foundation wasn’t going to go to the sidelines and take the year off from hosting the scholarship dinner! No, the creativity and imagination of the team has created this virtual event that will bring hundreds of Salukis to together to celebrate the tradition of Salukis helping Salukis.

And more is yet to come as the Foundation team looks for innovative and creative ways to continue to engage with our donors as the pandemic continues to force changes to our normal programming.

Hopefully at some point soon we will return to normalcy and our alumni and donors will return to the beautiful SIU campus to participate in the spectacular events of this most gorgeous campus. But until then, rest assured the SIU Foundation team will keep working hard and looking to engage alumni and donors to help supporting this great University.

Chicago Alumnus Donates $5,000 to the Saluki Food Pantry

Scott Moller ’85 presented Tena Bennett, director of the SIU Student Center with a donation of $5,000 to benefit the Saluki Food Pantry. LDP director, Bruce DeRuntz and junior Tamara Keene were also present for the check presentation at the Saluki Alumni Plaza.

Tena Bennett, the director at the SIU Student Center, home to the Saluki Food Pantry, recently received a $5,000 donation from alumnus Scott Moller ‘85. Bennett says that since March, they have given 1,000 emergency food bags to students in need and that this donation will go a long way to continue supporting this important initiative.

“The Saluki Food Pantry is 100 percent funded by private donations and we rely on those funds to purchase supplies and keep the doors to the pantry open,” said Bennett.

Moller is committed to solving hunger insecurity and contributes his time and donations to several food pantries in Illinois.

“Students here really need the help, especially in this time of living through a pandemic,” said Moller. He estimates his gift will provide 200 food bags to students who find themselves in need.

Moller, a member of the SIU Alumni Association and SIU Foundation boards, is encouraged by the efforts of the Leadership Development Program (LDP). The RSO recently did a food drive in front of the Student Center on October 15 and received over 630 food items that they donated to the food pantry. Bruce DeRuntz, professor of technology who leads the LDP, said the program truly transforms these students into leaders who give back to the community.

“SIU has a tradition of giving back and I am proud of the LDP students who donate their time and effort to help their fellow Salukis,” said DeRuntz.

If you would like to learn how you can give to the Saluki Food Pantry, learn more here: https://studentcenter.siu.edu/services/saluki-food-pantry.php